Lauren Gray

writelaurengray.com

287 notes

A hidden nerve is what every writer is ultimately about. It’s what all writers wish to uncover when writing about themselves in this age of the personal memoir. And yet it’s also the first thing every writer learns to sidestep, to disguise, as though this nerve were a deep and shameful secret that needs to be swathed in many sheaths.
André Aciman (via writetothestars)

(Source: writingquotes, via writetothestars)

34 notes

amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, André Brink, born 29 May 1935
Seven Quotes
Believe utterly in the story you have to tell.
Perhaps all one can really hope for, all I am entitled to, is no more than this: to write it down. To report what I know. So that it will not be possible for any man ever to say again: I knew nothing about it.
My library was — all libraries are — a place of ultimate refuge, a wild and sacred space where meanings are manageable precisely because they aren’t binding; and where illusion is comfortingly real. To read, to think, to trace words back to their origins real or presumed; to invent; to dare to imagine. “The Rights of Desire”
A country can’t love you. At most it may need you. It’s much the same as people.
If I speak with a character’s voice it is because that character’s become so much part of me that … I think I have the right then to imagine myself into the skin, into the life, into the dreams, into the experience of the particular character that I’ve chosen.
Now that the ANC has moved into power, its regime sadly must be branded as the enemy of the people.
No, I don’t ‘translate’ my work! I write every book in two languages: that is why the two versions are usually different from each other. Sometimes subtly, sometimes blatantly. Because every language has something that can be said in no other language, each of the two languages in which I write sends [me] in a somewhat different direction.
Read my 2005 interview with André Brink.
Brink is a South African novelist who is best know for his novel, A Dry White Season. He writes in both Afrikaans and English and is a Professor of English at the University of Cape Town.
Source for Image
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, André Brink, born 29 May 1935

Seven Quotes

  1. Believe utterly in the story you have to tell.
  2. Perhaps all one can really hope for, all I am entitled to, is no more than this: to write it down. To report what I know. So that it will not be possible for any man ever to say again: I knew nothing about it.
  3. My library was — all libraries are — a place of ultimate refuge, a wild and sacred space where meanings are manageable precisely because they aren’t binding; and where illusion is comfortingly real. To read, to think, to trace words back to their origins real or presumed; to invent; to dare to imagine. “The Rights of Desire”
  4. A country can’t love you. At most it may need you. It’s much the same as people.
  5. If I speak with a character’s voice it is because that character’s become so much part of me that … I think I have the right then to imagine myself into the skin, into the life, into the dreams, into the experience of the particular character that I’ve chosen.
  6. Now that the ANC has moved into power, its regime sadly must be branded as the enemy of the people.
  7. No, I don’t ‘translate’ my work! I write every book in two languages: that is why the two versions are usually different from each other. Sometimes subtly, sometimes blatantly. Because every language has something that can be said in no other language, each of the two languages in which I write sends [me] in a somewhat different direction.

Read my 2005 interview with André Brink.

Brink is a South African novelist who is best know for his novel, A Dry White Season. He writes in both Afrikaans and English and is a Professor of English at the University of Cape Town.

Source for Image

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

2,264 notes

At one magical instant in your early childhood, the page of a book—that string of confused, alien ciphers - shivered into meaning. Words spoke to you, gave up their secrets; at that moment, whole universes opened. You became, irrevocably, a reader.
Alberto Manguel, A History of Reading (via victoriousvocabulary)

(via books-wrote-my-story)

2 notes

"Nothing can dim the light which shines from within." - Maya Angelou
Your words will live on.

Click through for source.

"Nothing can dim the light which shines from within." - Maya Angelou

Your words will live on.

Click through for source.

Filed under maya angelou